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From the Publisher
Strange New Worlds  Issue 12 - February/March 1994

ISSUE 12:
From the Publisher
Wiring your own Phaser
SF Fans and Charity
Children's Dollhouses
How to Get It for Less
Science Fiction Movie Posters
Vintage SF Paperbacks
Books and Audios about TV
Blackadder Chronicles
Letters to the Publisher

 

SNW Issue 14
SNW Issue 13
SNW Issue 12
SNW Issue 11
SNW Issue 10
SNW Issue 09
SNW Issue 08
SNW Issue 04

 

I want to take this opportunity, the first issue of 1994, to express my thanks to the readers who have gone above and beyond to help these Strange New Worlds to blossom and grow. I was going to save these thank you's for the anniversary issue in April, but I've had such positive response that I just couldn't wait.

To Charles in New Jersey who says he always moves Strange New Worlds to the front of the rack when he sees it in bookstores -- thank you. To Patrick in Florida who asked to see the manager when told his local store didn't carry us -- thank you. To those who phoned and wrote to enquire what category Strange New Worlds falls under for Hugo award consideration -- thank you. (For future reference, or for those still completing your nominations for these annual science fiction awards, Strange New Worlds qualifies as a semi-prozine.) To everyone who sent such great suggestions and comments -- thank you. To my Grandmother and cousin Carol and great-aunt Margaret, who don't always understand science fiction, but subscribe anyway -- thank you, thank you, thank you.

When I began publishing this magazine two years ago, I had hoped that my efforts would strike a responsive chord with fellow collectors and science fiction fans. I never expected so much enthusiasm. Thank you, one and all!

We are starting the new year with several new additions. I hope you noticed the spiffy, color cover. We will be running full-color covers from now on, while still keeping the images framed within our traditional brilliant blue. In this issue's center-page spread is another first: a book excerpt. The charming book Yesterday's Tomorrows offers a look at the vibrant, innovative, and often exploitative movie posters of the 50s and 60s and the films that they promoted. In this excerpt the author discusses posters as collectibles, and how the market for these images from the past is evolving.

By the time you read this , the "second season" of television has started. Once again, Hollywood is trying to catch the attention and the imagination of science fiction fans. Mid-year replacements include the long-awaited, much promoted Babylon 5 and Tek War. These join the survivors from the beginning of the season: X-Files, seaQuest DSV, and Lois and Clark, The New Adventures of Superman. Science fiction has become big business. Each studio and network is rushing to position themselves to take advantage of the void soon to be created by the departure of Star Trek: The Next Generation, the most popular syndicated show currently on television. Amazingly, networks are allowing new, low-rated science fiction shows the chance to find their audience before relegating them to cancellation oblivion.

Remember last season's Space Rangers? You had to be quick to catch this campy space opera. CBS unceremoniously dumped it after only four airings. The quirky little series would never have challenged the Star Trek ratings machine; but given time the show might have developed a following. Space Rangers was silly science fiction that laughed at itself. As the networks finally take science fiction and science fiction fans seriously, I hope we do not start taking ourselves too seriously. There is still room for pure silliness in this genre.

Jo Davidsmeyer
Publisher

 

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